The House No Longer Ours - In collaboration with Susan McClelland
 
The repetition of felt, bricks and sticks provide both tangible evidence and rhetorical effect of moments without visible redundancy; no two are alike.  The handling and arranging of moments, what is cultivated versus rejected, provide the structure of community.

The bricks when new start as solid, measured and structured forms, easily recognizable. When they are found on the shore of Lake Erie, they are historical artifacts, altered through time and persistent battering; the original heavy configuration modified, leaving a softer remnant.  The effects of nature have uniquely changed each brick and its narrative.  The narratives feed our understanding of the present and the accumulation of narratives feed and form our communities.




 

The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours

The volume and variety of the recovered bricks.
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours

The cores become mortises and the sticks tenons.
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours

The felting was provided by Susan McClelland.
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours

"The House No Longer Ours" was arranged on the floor of the space creating paths through the "rubble" at Cleveland's Ingenuity Fest.
John T Adams The House No Longer Ours

After three days of public interaction a new arrangement was made and a gourd was added.
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